Saturday, 31 January 2015

Good stuff: Links & likes

Storage pot DIY: image source & © Make Do & Spend

There's been some pretty great stuff around the internet these past couple of weeks. Sometimes, when I'm putting together a links post, I struggle for material. Not so this time.

First up, Buzzfeed's piece imagining Hermione was the main character of the Harry Potter series -  renamed Hermione Granger and the Goddamm Patriarchy - is nothing short of genius. "Not all wizards, right?"

I loved E's post on getting organised, especially her super easy DIY storage pots. How great does her spare room look now?

The Militant Baker's article, about why people hate happy fat people, is just brilliant. I loved her notion of 'body currency' and the ways in which people feel ripped off, cheated, when someone doesn't participate in the expected battles with their body; when they don't strive for a media-created idea of perfection. Anyway, instead of listening to me summing it up, go read it.

Louisa's Tunnock's teacakes coasters look amazing, and simple to make too.

This piece - How Should An Abortion Be? - from Gawker is a much more nuanced and detailed look at some of the issues I raised in my post a couple of weeks ago. Essential reading.

Sarah wrote a superb take-down of the argument that feminists shouldn't care about the #NoMorePage3 campaign because 'there are bigger issues to worry about'.

Elise's series on her favourite blogs is a great source of new reading (and no, I'm not just mentioning it because she name-checked me. Although that was nice).

I know I definitely fall into a blog rut - not so much with regard to writing here (although that happens too!), but in terms of the other blogs I'll comment on or the bloggers I interact with on the regular. This post about blogging acts of kindness was therefore a welcome reminder of the nice things I can do as a blog reader (via Becky).

A MASSIVE thank you to all of you who've posted and tweeted about the Big Blog Clothes Swap. Don't forget that sign-up is open until 9th February, and we're especially in need of size 14+ swappers.

Finally, I've been having a tough time at work lately. I think all educators go through phases of wondering why we bother; feeling like the battle to get kids learning might not be worth the cost it inflicts on us. And then Humans Of New York began a series about a middle school in Brooklyn and every night I get home from school, look at his latest pictures and read the captions, and cry. It's an incredibly powerful series, one that really reminds me just why I do the job. If you haven't been following, scroll back to 20th January and look at the first photo of Vidal speaking about his principal, Ms Lopez. Then work your way forwards, through each incredible story, and the fundraising that's gone on, and I defy you to stay dry-eyed.

13 comments:

  1. Thank you for featuring my little spare room! Some brilliant links here, I especially love the blogging acts of kindness, and I cannot wait for the big blog clothes swap to begin!

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    1. It's a pleasure - I was very inspired by your organising (although not inspired enough to organise my own spare room, haha!)

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  2. Thanks for the shout out lady! A massive thank you to you as well for organising the clothes swap, I hope you get some more people to sign up, it's such a good idea! xx

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  3. I love those teacake coasters - so imaginative! Thanks for this round-up - it's a lovely eclectic mix of posts :-)

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  4. The Humans of New York story is inspiring indeed. ♥

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    1. It's incredible, it still makes me tear up whenever I think about all that money raised and what a difference it will make to the lives of those kids!

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  5. Cor this is a good line-up! The militant baker article is ace and I shall definitely be thinking more about my blogger interactions thanks to the acts of kindness list.

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  6. I too have been following that HONY series and agree that it is heartwarming. However, I work in what is probably an equivalent UK school in terms of deprivation and social issues, and I just feel like not one pupil wants to be 'saved' from that life, and all my efforts are folded into a paper aeroplane and thrown back in my face (literally). It's depressing indeed.

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    1. Honestly, I don't know how you (or any teacher in a school like that) does it. I find teaching draining and tough enough as it is, and that's with classes who actually are eager and motivated. I'm amazed by people who work in tough schools: I couldn't do it.

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  7. Oh these are good reads - thanks so much for sharing them :)

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  8. Ah, don't feel disheartened. You are doing a great job and you never know how much good you are doing. Kids can be horrid, stubborn and annoying, but we just keep on plodding on. xx

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